4 Reviews

I'm really sorry, but even though I followed this recipe perfectly to the last word, the bagels turned out hard like hockey pucks! I may be mistaken, but doesn't the yeast have to be proofed first? This was my first attempt at making bagels, so maybe I did something wrong, but after this disaster, I don't think I'll be trying any bagel recipe soon!

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Anu November 09, 2002

This is an awesome recipe! I love baking, but don't have the time to spend days doing it. I can make a batch of these on Saturday morning and have enough for breakfast every day that week and still use some for sandwiches in my lunch.

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Jadalynn February 06, 2010

Very nice. I made these with 3/4 whole wheat flour and 1/4 white. I also cut the sugar in half, but they were still incredibly tasty. My dd's gave them two thumbs up!

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sugaree May 29, 2007

This is the exact same recipe my mom has made every year (our family's New Year's tradition). It is excellent--chewey, tough yet soft, and oh so yummy. Plus, there is NO FAT in this recipe! In answer to the commenter above, no, you don't "proof" the yeast separately for this recipe, or for many other breads. That's mostly required for cake yeast, not the kind in jars or packets. But don't take the 20 minute rise as set in stone. If your bagels aren't rising, give them longer! Make sure they're covered with a cloth, out of drafts, and in a reasonably warm environment. Also, your yeast may have been dead if it was too old, and sometimes Rapid Rise yeast acts oddly.

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Anissa Wolf January 02, 2007
Bagels II